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the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the lon
report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: fr and a ha mlion pple are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by includi
and new jersey: another storm takes aim at the region, as sandy's recovery slogs on, and the hunt for fuel heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see n
. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's brutal october surprised. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these photographs worth? how do you compete with the natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near its. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? jeep jobs in china flap. >> sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we thought this is going to be a special preelection broadcast, that all we would have to do is handicapped the election. then along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wise man told me once that you can never see around t corner. i don't want to minimize the tragic human dimensions of this giant storm and its aftermath, but this is a political program and the election is next tuesday, so here goes. we start with new jersey gov. christie prior to hurricane sandy. >> send you back to chicago -- give you the plane trip back to chicago you have earned. i cannot thank the presiden
slows down, u.s. exports may follow suit. hurricane sandy showed up in the latest report on jobless claims, making them artificially low. initial claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000 at the end of last week. the number is expected to be revised higher as more data is collected. the labor department says one state filed fewer claims because of power outages, while the storm boosted claims in other states where more people looking for relief. later in the program, we'll look at sandy's impact on retailers. >> tom: the biggest bank in america has the okay now from uncle sam to pay back shareholders. jpmorgan will be allowed to restart a stock buyback plan early next year. like all systemically important banks jpmorgan has to get regulatory approval to change its dividend or stock-repurchase plan. the regulators want banks to have enough financial firepower to withstand troubled times before the banks will spend money on share holders. jpmorgan's buyback strategy was suspended this year after it lost $6 billion when aderivave trading strateg
clarity on the impact of superstorm sandy. do you have more clarity now? >> i do have clarity on sandy and frankly it's devastating. particularly on individuals. we had 200 of our stores closed for the first three days of the november period and then many more were closed after that because we didn't have power. we definitely were impacted in a major way at our company. >> reporter: for the current quarter you expect to fall short of wall street forecasts by at least five cents. are you still comfortable with those expectations? >> we try to guide honestly and if we're able to exceed that number that's always good news. but we try to guide where we believe we're going to be so we're confident with our forecasts. >> reporter: terry thank you so much. >> thanks ruben. >> tom: while many wal-mart employees spent black friday working the check-out line, others were manning the picket line. they used the high profile shopping day to protest low wages, work schedules and employee benefits. the protests were organized by a union-backed employee group called "our walmart". demonstrations were
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown repos onhe btle of the grod ga, ha fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 0 years. bnf, t engine that
drugs, which come with higher margins. the company said hurricane sandy will hit fourth quarter earnings by about a penny per share. four of the five most actively traded e.t.f.s were higher, but the ipath s&p 500 exchange traded note was the weakest, down 3.5%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: in the storm-ravaged states of new york and new jersey, officials made sure everyone today would be able to vote. authorities let residents uprooted by hurricane sandy vote at any polling center in their states. in new jersey, some citizens were even allowed to cast ballots by email. as suzanne pratt reports, sandy's chaos didn't stop voters from getting to the polls. >> reporter: parsippany, new jersey, was hit hard by hurricane sandy. many homes still have no power, and many gas stations are still dry. nevertheless, residents made it their business to vote today, even though their polling site had to be moved at the last minute to a new location. >> reporter: in manhattan, only a handful of voting centers had to be changed because of the storm's aftermath. this site downtown is als
with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y
from superstorm sandy continue to rise,aul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt
sandy and one of many questions do these hurricanes have something to do with global warming. and mao -- how do we prepare fr them in the 2350u67. joining me bryan walsh of "time" magazine, paul barrett of bloomberg businessweek and steve coll of the new yorker magazine. >> people are not able to live at sea level along these coasts like they have in the past. we have to protect it with walls. >> rose: also this evening we look at some of the responses to hurricane sandy that did work and did save lives. joining me did jon lapook medical correspondent with the cbs evening news with scott pelley. >> we like to stay away from the word miracle, we really do. that's an overused word. i will say when i got there that night, i had the feeling at the pit of my stomach at first when i walked in, i thought oh my, this isn't a movie. we don't know how this is going to end. this could end with death. the were nodeaths as far as we know of anybody or catastrophes. >> rose: finally this evening we change courses and turn to narco terrorism in mexico and talk about that with mexico's secretary o
there are still recovering from supersandy. >> a week after hurricane sandy coast sea breed flooding along the east coast. the northeast is dealing with snow because of the mixed storm system. we have video out of new york. here is a shot of a water tanker that run aground after sandy. people are still struggling to recover from the devastation. let's show you the weather map. conditions have across the mid-atlantic coast as well as washington. new england and atlanta canada are dealing with heavy snow as well as strong winds. the system will quickly move off. out towards the west things are getting active as a new system is moving across this continent. we're seeing rain showers in the sierras and northern rockies. we're seeing heavy snow in montana and alberta. visibility could reduce to 40 meters. it's a very dangerous conditions. snow will also spread to the northern plains. temperatures very chilly. denver at 19 degrees. we'll be cooling down to minus two on your sunday. on the other hand temperatureses are getting back up. moving into east asia. rain is intensifying over southern chi
by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's glol warming, stupidif hurrine sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. and as a consequence, i think we've got an obligation to future generations to do something about it. >> but he made it clear that actually doing something about it will take a back seat to the economy for now. he did return to new york on thursday to review the recovery effort on staten island. climate change and hurricane sandy brought naomi klein to town, too. you may know her as the author of "the shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism." readers of two influential magazines to put naomi klein high on the list of the 100 leading public thinkers in the world. she is now reporting for a new book and documentary on
sandy. on the east coast, volunteers across the spectrum are serving food, providing shelter and helping with cleanup in a massive relief operation. this week, ny othose forts we hampereby evn mo bad weather. kim lawton has more on the efforts in one new york community. >> a week after sandy, rabbi shneur wolowik of the chabad lubavitch movement is in the devastated rockaway beach area of new york. he's visiting some of the many families in his congregation whose homes are unlivable. when sandy hit, this family awoke to the sound of water rushing in. >> where were you at the time? >> i was in bed and then i heard the back door sprang open from the force of the water from the lake. it filled up the steps from the basement and after it got to a certain level, it just knocked the door right out. >> wolowik is director of the chabad center of the five towns in cedarhurst. he says the needs in his community are overwhelming. >> we find ourselves in an unprecedented and historical hurricane which uprooted hundreds of people, their homes, their belongings, their lives, their valuables. >at the
sandy. two days have passed since the storm hit landfall late monday night. flooding and storm surge has left unprecedented damage in parts of brooklyn, queens, lower manhattan, and new jersey. at least 46 people are dead and millions are without power as a result of the storm. many new yorkers tried to return to work today but limited transit and power are expected to continue. city officials emphasize that crews are working none stop to help life return to normal. president obama joined governor chris christie earlier in the day to survey the damage to new jersey's coast. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet on this block and thought new jersey, throughout the region whose lives have been upended myecond message ise are he for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow, and you see that, and the president has seen that today, in the eyes and faces of a lot of the folks he's met, and that sorrow is appropriate. we suffere
of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, even though they were outmanned and outgunned. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: this was another difficult day in the aftermath of hurricane sandy.
. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21stentury. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, a the pestinians sai
of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other waterside ties. the massive force of the storm's destruction along the jersey shore came fully into view today. town after town presented stark scenes of wrecked homes and boats, underscoring the long process of rebuilding that lies ahead. one of those towns was the long beach community north of atlantic city, where army national guard troops arrived to assist. >> a lot of devastation. the island has been hit very hard. from what i understand there is roughly 18,000 homes without power, there is severe gas leaks, so right now we are just trying to get everything together for the office of emergency management here and the different municipalities and just assist them with whatever needs they have going on. >> brown: and even three days later, some long beach residents still could not believe the power of the storm. >> this was the deepest water i have ever seen, in my lifetime of being here. i was 11 in the '62 storm and the water ca
. >> ifill: the northeast took slow steps toward recovery today, one week after hurricane sandy hit. but for many in new jersey and neyorknormal routines are still a long way off. we have two reports, beginning with an overview from kwame holman. >> reporter: it was the closest think to a full-scale morning commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new jersey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trains >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn und the east river were open. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don't think it's really normal for anyone right now. we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. >> reporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still without power with temperatures dropping int
in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> this is awful, this is just beyond, it's terrible, it's awful, i am done. >> mother nature is really killing us right now. sorry for whatever we did, we will make it up to you. >> it's snowing, this is like insult to injury, we just had a hurricane, now we 're having a blizzard. >> sreenivasan: the worst was the wind-- gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour that blacked out customers who'd just had their power restored. by this morning, 750,000 homes and businesses were in the dark in the new york region-- 200,000 more than before the nor'easter hit. governor andrew cuomo charged utility companies planned poorly for "sandy" and are still playing catch-up. >> you look at what a utility company does and it basically comes down to wire and poles and crews and trucks. these are things you would want to have. how c you run out of poles? and then we have utility companies competing with each other to find the poles the way we competed to find crews and equipment. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, on the roads, the snow made bumper- to-bumper collisions a common sight, especia
to the impact of superstorm sandy. dealers' attention now focused on the very important policy watch, the u.s. jobs data, which will be out on friday, as well as the u.s. presidential election next week. so a lot to watch out for. back to the studio. >> a lot to watch out for indeed, thank you very much. our business reporter at the tokyo stock exchange. >>> that's all for business news for this hour. i'll leave you with a recap of the markets. >>> u.s. president barack obama would be speaking to crowd after crowd in swing states if it hadn't been for the storm. he has less than a week to convince undecided voters. st americans have already examined his record over the past four years. he started his term with a sentiment offered by many of those who came before him. >> that america can change. our union can be perfected. >> many americans have grown tired of what their country had come to represent under george w. bush. obama promised change at home and abroad. he brought an end to the war in iraq. he said u.s. combat forces would pull out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. and he promised
benefits jumped to a one-and-a-half year high, surging 78,000, thanks to super- storm sandy. the total was 439,000. meantime, consumer inflation slowed to a one tenth of a percent increase, thanks to lower energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the enomys faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is what
york and some other districts hit by hurricane sandy late october despite a moderate improvement overall. on consumer spending, most districts saw an increase at a moderate pace and they also gave mostly upbeat expectations for the holiday sales season. on housing, the report says the market continued to improve across most districts. selling prices were steady or rising. on employment, over half the districts reported improvements. but in manufacturing, 7 of the 12 districts reported that activity slowed or declined somewhat compared to the previous report. >>> on the tokyo foreign exchange, the dollar is gaining ground against the yen this morning. dollar/yen is fetching 82.04-08 at the moment. analysts say concerns over the u.s. economic outlook eased slightly after u.s. president barack obama and a top republican in congress hinted they were optimistic about a deal over the so-called fiscal cliff. the euro is edging higher against the yen and that's changing hands at 106.24-26. let's take a look at stocks now. tokyo share prices are edging higher as concerns about the u.s. ec
with the devastation of hurricane sandy. the storm affected at least 17 states, caused massive flooding and left millions without power. religious leaders, including pope benedict xvi, prayed for the victims and for a strong recovery. and many faith-based groups quickly rallied to help those impacted by the storm. among them, the north american mission board, the relief arm of the southern baptist convention. mike ebert is the mission board's vice president for communications. he joins us from the board's headquarters in atlanta, georgia. mike, welcome. let me begin with getting -- inviting you to talk about the extent of the sbc's efforts here. how many people do you have? what are you doing? >> well, bob, we have 82,000 trained disaster relief volunteers. 1,500 disaster relief units and we will by monday be at a 400,000 meal capacity. so we'll be preparing 400,000 hot meals to be served to victims and other first responders and that will be kind of the beginning point for us. we'll see where it goes from there. >> i heard on the radio the mayor of hoboken a couple of days ago pleading for peop
results don't even include the sales lift from superstorm sandy. home depot also raised its profit outlook for the year. if housing continues to improve, experts say it's a bullish sign for the rest of the economy. >> now, as we start to see residential investment recovery, that should help other sectors ofhe economy throu demd for building materials, through more demand for other products-- furniture, you name it! >> reporter: she's optimistic housing will remain one of the few bright spots in an otherwise sluggish recovery. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: it was an unhappy earnings story in the third quarter for saks. the upscale department store said sales and profits were hurt by a modest spike in promotions. on top of that, saks expects sales to be flat in the current holiday period because of a slow start to november due to hurricane sandy. noow, trouble at saks underscores new worries spreading throughout the luxury sector about the all important holiday season. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: on manhattan's 5th avenue, it's beginning to look a lot like christmas. fr
slid 0.3% in october, more than expected, and the first decline in three months. hurricane sandy was behind at least some of the sales decline. but there are fresh worries today about the underlying strength of the american consumer. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: hurricane sandy is going to get blamed a lot in the coming weeks for soft economic data. and, rightfully so. after all the superstorm paralyzed a good chunk of the northeast for at least a week. that meant, no shopping, no eating out, and no filling up the tank. >> clearly, the retail sales data were weak and they were weak across a lot of categories. the commerce dept did talk about the affects on hurricane sandy on the numbers. but, it's hard to quantify. >> reporter: the question is whether that consumer paalysis will continue into the all important holiday retail season. many economists say that really depends on whether americans feel secure in the their jobs. here's the good news: there has recently been some improvement on the labor front. on top of that, many shoppers are finding their wallets are thicker n
spiking because of hurricane sandy. that's welcome relief to many drivers, but it still costs more to fill up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any
.s. exports also helped. the impact super-storm sandy has had on the job market seems to be dissipating. 23,000 fewer americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits during thanksgiving week compared to a week earlier. the total was 393,000. it had jumped to over 400,000 in the weeks following t storm. still, we saw just modest gains on wall street today-- the dow rose 36 points, the nasdaq was up 20, and the s&p 500 added six. >> tom: the roster of companies announcing special one-time paydays for their shareholders continued growing today. taxes on stock dividends are currently set at 15%. but with no deal on the fiscal cliff, dividends will be taxed like regular income, meaning they could go up to over 40% for some high-income households. we spoke with larry mendelson, the chairman and c.e.o. at avionics gear maker heico, which announced its own special dividend this week. larry, thank you for joining us, we appreciate it. what role did the fiscal cliff play in heico decision to paid fiscal dividend. >> i think the fiscal cliff was very important. and moreover the threat to increase
hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could also bring wind gusts of 65 miles an hour-- bedeviling efforts to restore power to more than 600,000 customers stil
the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: egypt's leaders tried today to mediate a truce between israel and hamas, but there was no outward
york, a man in the middle of the response to hurricane sandy. >> the scope of the damage, it looked to me t reminded me of vietnam-- veeted nam, seeing areas that were bombed out,ou kw, the b-52 bombings. obviously didn't have the structures there that we have here but just wide swathe of damage. >> ialways happens in somebody else's backyard n the midwest or south. but something like this would just not anticipated and could not have been anticipated based on our history. >> rose: also this evening the last political weekend before the election on tuesday, we talk with john dickerson the political director of cbs news. >>hio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with
to have a better close than romney. one was the storm. sandy. there's no question that happened. there's no question that the hug if you will, with governor christie played to what people wanted to see. i'm looking at the iowa poll that was done over the weekend. they asked the question "who's the stronger leader?" in iowa romney had a slight advantage, now it's obama 50% to 42%. i agree with what john said earlier. iowand nevada have been put away. i don't think new hampshire and wisconsin have. but i think that's reflect in that poll. the second that's occurred is every single poll i've seen shows more optimism about the economy than there was a month ago. not people aren't off the charts mind you, but a third of the people think the economy is in good shape. another 20% think it's getting in better shape and those are better numbers than the summer. >> rose: let me ask about florida, john harris, and pennsylvania. >> it looks like florida is most likely in romney's camp. not certain. it seems to me that if obama wins florida he's going to win a bunch of other states and we'll have a
at columbia university. >> susie: new damage estimates today on super storm sandy. the insurance industry will be on the hook for as much as $22 billion, according to numbers compiled by disaster-modeling firm air worldwide. the total is three billion less than the original tally, issued just after hurricane sandy made landfall in late october. >> tom: it was back to work for wall street, with the major stock indices ending mixed. the selling was stronger earlier in the day, with the s&p 500 hitting its lowest level of the session before noon eastern time. the losses were reduced in afternoon trade with the index finishing down just 0.2%. trading volume remains modest. 630 million shares on the big board. a tad over 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. the selling pressure showed up in the telecommunication sector, falling 1%. the energy and consumer staples sectors also fell. with so much focus on consumers and spending over the weekend, grocery stocks led the consumer sector lower today. super markets safeway and whole foods were down 3.2% and 3.1% respectively. kraft foods fell 2.1%. kraft trade
and thomas, thank you both for joining us. >> ifill: now, a report on the recovery from the superstorm sandy. new york governor andrew cuomo said today he intends to ask the federal government for at least $30 billion in aid. new jersey is still tallying its losses, and damages in the region are expected to exceed $50 billion. schools officially reopened today in one community along the jersey shore. but for the past week, teachers have been already hard at work, helping students deal with the aftermath of the storms. special correspondent john tulenko of learning matters filed this story from the town of belmar. >> reporter: hurricane sandy tore into belmar, new jersey. >> belmar was one of the towns you would continually hear about on the radio. families reported seeing four, five, six-foot wall of water >> how are you? reporter: lisa hannah is assistant principal at belmar's one elementary school. many of her students are recent immigrants. most of their families had nowhere else to go. >> i don't think anyone was really prepared for what happened >> reporter: inside this house three chil
. that means the east coast where hurricane sandy devastated will be seeing another round of stormy conditions ahead of the middle part of the week. rain will start in atlanta on tuesday and washington, d.c. and new york city will see rain showers on your wednesday and even snow showers are possible overnight wednesday and thursday. on tuesday when the presidential election will be taking place sunny weather will prevail with low temperatures here and sunny weather also continue in los angeles getting up to 29 degrees on tuesday. finally let's go over to europe. severe weather in the baltic states. it will be moving ai away toward the northeast. showers will remain. any slight amount of rain could trigger further flooding as well as land slides and a big storm system is moving in from the north. that's going to affect central europe as well add much of t scandanavian peninsula. very warm in athens getting up to 27. here is the extended forecast. >>> our top story this hour, finance leaders from around the world have wrapped up another meeting with yet another pledge about the economy. represen
back on after hurricane sandy hit last week. >>> following an overnight plunge on wall street tokyo share prices are falling thursday morning. the key nikkei arm now currently standing at 8888. that is down 84 points, or just about 1%. investors placing sell orders on especially export-related issues. currencies, the dollar is currently being sold against the yen. worries about u.s. and european economies. the dollar/yen, 79.96-80.01. the euro/yen, 102.01-06. market players are buying the yen, it's regarded as a relatively safe asset amid pessimistic factors. those include the overnight sell-off on wall street, as well as the grim economic outlook for the eurozone which was released on wednesday. take a look at some of the asian indecks as well. australia's index, it is down .75% at 4483. >>> obama's going to spend much of his time until the end of the year trying to avoid the fiscal cliff and we spoke with rich ars katz, editor in chief of "the oriental economist report." >> 50/50 chance the fiscal cliff can be avoided. if people come to their senses and compromise the impact will
areas in new york city still grappling with the aftermath of hurricane sandy. the president met with first responders and victims. faith-based relief groups continue to help with the clean-up. the relief arm of the southern baptist convention says it will provide meals through december. and islamic relief usa announced it will partner with the church of jesus christ of latter day saints, the mormons, to deliver supplies to heavily hit parts of new york and new jersey. >>> there were sharp words exchanged between china and the dalai lama as the number of self-immolations by tibetans grew dramatically. speaking in japan, the dalai lama called for an investigation into the causes behind t immolations and faulted china for seeing buddhism as a threat. china meanwhile once again accused the dalia lama of glorifying the suicides. at least ten tibetans inside china set themselves on fire in the last two weeks to protest china's policy on tibet. >>> we have a special commemoration today of what many say is the world's greatest work of art, michelangelo's ceiling of the sistine chapel in
of houses are still out of power due to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. i think the snow will make things work especially with the travel disturbances. chicago looking at 1 degrees. moving over to the european continent. still gusty conditions and unstable weather. wet also. some heavy rain could target the regions that the flooding situations not alleviated yet. across the south central and the mid mediterranean regions very unstable conditions. hail, damaging winds and also heavy rain is on tap. here is your extended forecast. >>> opposition activists in syria say government pilots have dropped a cluster bomb on a playground. they say the air strike killed ten children. residents say the children went out to play during fighting. opposition forces captured an air base on sunday near damascus. government troops responded with air attacks on towns around the base. opposition activists say one fighter jet womaned the fl bomb playground. cluster bombs scatter a number of those smaller bombs over a wide area increasing casualties. syrian officials have not signed the agreement. the internati
that was hard hit by hurricane sandy and there were all sorts of questions, gwen, about whether enough people-- people who wanted to vote would be able to vote. we saw the terrible devastation there along the shoreline. but the results are in, at least as much as it takes for the associated press to make a call. >> ifill: i have read more amazing stories today about pregnant women who were on the way to the hospital who decided to vote. people who stood in the dark in lines in order to vote. in spite of what happened with that hurricane. >> woodruff: comparisons being made to hurricane katrina, not only new jersey and new york. we also want to say this brings the electoral college projected total at this point-- it's early in the evening-- to 79 electoral votes for president obama 82 electoral vote for governor romney. we know we need 270-- they need 270 in order to become president. >> ifill: of course we have to talk about new jersey because david and mark, chris christie, the governor of the new jersey, royaled the wate a littlebit this week by actually having kind things to say about pres
, third, there was hurricane sandy. what which of these theories do you think are accurate? >> well, wherever anyone loses there are people who say it's the candidates' fault, it's never the strategists fault, it's never the people's fault, it's always the candidates' fault. mitt romney had a difficult primary process. he came through it. therefore he was a better candidate than the other six or eight people that ran in that race. but he did struggle. i do think there are a number of points after the primaries where you didn't quite understand exactly what that came -- campaign was about. so they didn't really get their legs. not only -- not only did they seem to get their legs-- in hindsight it didn't have as much of an impact as much as the media made-- was that debate. i think there are things about that party, especially since 2010, that have really stressed them as far as their ability to be -- go beyond a very small base. as we've had demographic changes cultural changes they've not been able to adapt, so far, or the that changing picture i think hurricane sandy, obviously the
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